0393191_framing-violence_300Framing Violence: Conflicting Images, Identities, and Discourses

Framing Violence: Conflicting Images, Identities, and Discourses explores many of the questions surrounding challenges in framing the rising violence across the globe and in its emerging, new forms. The chapters in this volume provide multidisciplinary case studies and theoretical debates, with violence being discussed not only in its political form, but also in its domestic, financial, and artistic forms. This collection will provide a venue for discussions on the diverse issues surrounding the theme of violence and conflict from international and interdisciplinary perspectives, and divided into three parts, the first of which focuses on how the culture industry frames violence and violent actors. The second part investigates how violence is framed in legal structures and mediascapes. Finally, the third part of the book discusses the new conceptualisations in violence studies and covers chapters analysing artistic expressions of violence.


0227504_new-media-politics_300New Media Politics: Rethinking Activism and National Security in Cyberspace

 New Media Politics: Rethinking Activism and National Security in Cyberspace explores many of the questions surrounding the new challenges that have arisen as a result of the emergence of cyberspace, including cyber-activism, cyberterrorism, and cyber-security. The chapters in this volume provide case studies that span an array of geographies as they debate questions regarding conceptual issues in cyberspace and the relationship between politics, cyberterrorism and cyber-activism, as well as state and international regulations concerning cyberspace, resistance movements in cyberspace, and media frameworks concerning terrorism, civil liberties, and government restrictions. This collection will provide a venue for discussions on the diverse issues surrounding the theme of new media politics from international and interdisciplinary perspectives. The volume is divided into two parts, the first of which focuses on how cyberspace has been used in activism, acts of resistance and protests. The second part investigates issues related to how online media is used in terrorism and how governments have sometimes perceived cyberspace as a threat, leading at times to regulations which threaten to curtail liberties in the name of protecting the “security” of the state against enemies that may be seen as “internal” or “external.”

If It Was Not for Terrorism: Crisis, Compromise, and Elite Discourse in the Age of “War on Terror” aims to investigate questions regarding the hegemonic power that is exercised by elites (and mass media) through the discourse of “War on Terror.” The chapters in the volume provide case studies from a wide variety of geographies to debate questions regarding the construction of the meaning of “terrorism,” communication of collective identities and otherness, and media frames regarding the “War on Terror,” civil liberties, and government restrictions. In bringing this collection together, it was the editors’ intention to provide a venue for discussion of expressions and diverse concerns around the themes of media and terrorism from international and interdisciplinary perspectives. The edited volume is divided into two parts. The first part focuses on elite discourse about the definition of “terrorism” and discursive strategies involved in construction of “us” vs. “others.” The second part of the volume investigates issues related to media framing of the compromises that are deemed necessary for success in the “War on Terror.” At the same time, several chapters of this part also identify opportunities for resistance to hegemonic discourse.